Book Reviews

Neverhome, by Laird Hunt

Reviewed by Billie Hinton

Neverhome is the story of a young farmer’s wife, Constance, who recreates herself as a male Union soldier and travels from Indiana to Ohio to “defend the Republic.” She gives her name as Ash Thompson from Darke County, gets her uniform, and marches with her new regiment south to war. Laird Hunt’s lyrical novel is written in the voice of Constance/Ash, and it is her gritty, distinctive voice that drives the story as she quickly earns the nickname Gallant Ash, Read more here.

The Other Typist, by Suzanne Rindell

Reviewed by Linda Lindsey Davis

It is 1924. Prim, plain Rose Baker lives in a boarding house in Brooklyn. She spends her days typing police interrogation reports in a Lower East side precinct. While her work days are filled with stories of shootings, stabbings and robberies, the most exciting thing in her personal life is whether the boarding house stew will be beef or chicken tonight. Rose’s regimented, predictable life begins to fall apart when Odalie Lazar is hired for the precinct typing pool. more…

Turning on a Dime, by Maggie Dana

Reviewed by Carol Baldwin

Time travel. The Civil War. Multi-cultural. Horses. Romance. There aren’t many books that fit such a wide variety of categories—but Turning on a Dime by Maggie Dana does just that.

Samantha DeVries’ father is Lucas DeVries, a third-generation American of Dutch descent and master horseman; her mother, Gretchen, is an African-American and a history buff who has traced her family’s lineage back to 1875.

Caroline Chandler is the daughter of a plantation owner in Mississippi who prefers her brother’s… Read more.

Necessary Lies, By Diane Chamberlain

Reviewed by Linda Lindsey Davis

Ivy and Mary was here.

These five words are carved into the closet door of an old Raleigh North Carolina home. No one knows the origin of the words but each of the previous owners has been cautioned by their predecessor not to remove the words or cover them up.

Diane Chamberlain’s latest mystery is set in the South of the 1960s, when the social realities of … Read more here.

The Black Hour, by Lori Rader-Day

Reviewed by Rich Magahiz

The Black Hour by Lori Rader-Day is set up as a crime novel where the reader has no doubt as to who committed the crime in question or how. Still, the reader feels a lot of suspense as the main character, Amelia Emmet, tries to unravel various mysteries that her near-fatal shooting and the suicide of the shooter brings to the surface. Some of the mysteries are quite clear to her…

Citadel, By Kate Mosse

Reviewed by Robyn McIntyre

From the story of Sparta’s 300, the Maccabees, through to the lunch counter sit-ins of the Civil Rights movement, history has hundreds of thousands of stories of individuals who continued to fight their enemies, though outnumbered. Most of these stories are framed by what the people were fighting against—tyranny, religious persecution, manifest destiny, genocide. In Citadel, Kate Mosse writes about what the fight is for—love.

Chasing the Sun, By Natalia Sylvester

Natalia Sylvester will be guest host of #LitChat on June 11, 2014, from 4-5 p.m. E.D.T. Follow #LitChat in Twitter, or login to our direct channel at www.nurph.com/litchat.

Reviewed by Mary Vensel White

In Natalia Sylvester’s debut novel, Chasing the Sun, the curtain rises on a domestic drama involving Andres and Marabela, an upper-class Peruvian couple. Married for many years, they have grown apart and dispassionate. They sleep separately and spend most of their time in their own pursuits.

Book Review: Fangirl, by Rainbow Rowell

Reviewed by Kim Miner Litton

With some authors, you really have to wait for their next project. By then, you wonder if they’ll be able to recapture the magic of that first book, or if you’ll love them same way. In fact, you wonder if you really ever liked them in the first place or if you are just remembering them more fondly in retrospect. Rainbow Rowell’s Eleanor and Park exploded on the YA book scene in February of 2013; it was critically acclaimed and left many wondering what else we could expect from this new, exciting voice in realistic fiction.

Book Review: The Twin’s Daughter, Lauren Baratz-Logsted

Reviewed by Kim Miner Litton

Many teens will come to me looking for a historical fiction novel in the young adult section and, honestly, it’s a bit hard to find them. Of the ones that do exist, many authors have trouble translating the historical experience without alienating (or boring) young readers. The Twin’s Daughter by Lauren Baratz-Logstead had all the pomp and beauty of a Victorian historical with the creeping uncertainty of a Gothic mystery. Read more here

Book Review: Lexicon, by Max Berry

Reviewed by Rich Magahiz

Thriller is the chosen genre of the 21st century. We are by now very familiar with its vocabulary of shadowy conspiracies, strangers with unknown motivations, mooks who find themselves on the short side of a firearm, traveling undetected through public transportation, the constant threat of assassination, the puppet master, jailbreaks. In his new novel, Lexicon, Max Barry has come up with a way to infuse it with something new by mixing in some speculative brain science. Read more here.

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