About LitChat

LitChat is a fun, fast, and friendly way for book-lovers to talk about reading, writing and publishing on Twitter. We have moderated chat each Monday from 4-5 p.m. E.T.

Coming Up

All #litchat sessions begin each Monday at 4 p.m. E.T. and run until 5 p.m. E.T. You can follow the #litchat conversation in Twitter, or login directly to our dedicated channel at www.nurph.com/litchat.

Special #LitChat MFA Chats

LitChat is teaming up with the faculty of a new MFA program in writing for children and young adults at Sierra Nevada College for a series of evening click here to read more.

Author Blogs

The Tribe’s the Thing

The Tribe’s the Thing

The trajectory of my writing career has never been a normal one (if there is such a thing). My major was English, not Creative Writing, because I loved reading and writing about literature (I still do), and I didn’t finish my graduate degree until I was thirty….

A Writer’s Success Isn’t Book Sales Alone

A Writer’s Success Isn’t Book Sales Alone

It happens every day to writers: your book gets published and, as excited as you may have been, it goes nowhere or doesn’t go where you thought it would. Maybe it had a bad cover, poor marketing, another similar book came out at the same time with better packaging—you name it….

Writers Need Social Stimulation as Much as Solitude

Writers Need Social Stimulation as Much as Solitude

Writing books was supposed to be a dying art form. Poetry cast to the age of the dinosaurs—extinct with only the fossil remains of long dead masters of the craft. Parties? For writers? Puhlease! Writers aren’t fun. Writers don’t… party. Or do they?

Literature in the Digital Age

Literature in the Digital Age

I recently participated remotely in a discussion sponsored by the Funding Arts Network, the Betsy Hotel and Florida International University’s Miami Beach Urban Studios. While the other panelists were on site, I was connected by Skype video and projected on the event’s audio visual screen. Posted below is a Sway presentation featuring the text from my talk….

Crossover Fiction About Families

Crossover Fiction About Families

The magic pixie dust for how to reach lots and lots of readers may be elusive, but two things about book discoverability are indisputable: readers are always on the look out for good stories and writers are increasingly desperate to find their people. While the definition of crossover fiction…

Writing in the Round

Writing in the Round

Writers have a complicated and ever-changing relationship with the reader. And by the reader, I mean that hypothetical audience to which you’re supposed to be writing, that intended receptacle for your wisdom, your crafted prose, the performance of your particular form of entertainment: the delivery of a story….

Not a Review of Gail Godwin’s Memoir, Publishing

Not a Review of Gail Godwin’s Memoir, Publishing

It’s easy to compare ourselves to other writers and it’s a maladaptive practice we all engage in all the time, like kids looking around the table to see who got the biggest slices of pizza. The truth is, for all the differences we think exist, we have so much in common….

BEA and BookCon 2015: A Week-long Magic Carpet Ride

BEA and BookCon 2015: A Week-long Magic Carpet Ride

Alan Zweibel author, comedian, actor said at a panel at BookCon 2015 in New York City, “if you’re really lucky, you get to be friends with the artists you admire.”

From May 26 to 31 I felt a buzz about me like none other I’d experienced as a writer. I walked into the Javits Center…

Miami in Minneapolis: More on AWP

Miami in Minneapolis: More on AWP

The AWP Conference and Book Fair is an annual destination for writers, teachers, students, editors, and publishers. Each year more than 12,000 attendees join for four days of dialogue, networking, and unrivaled access to the organizations and opinion-makers that matter most in contemporary literature. The 2015 featured over 2,000 presenters and 550 readings. The Book Fair hosted over 700 presses, journals, and literary organizations…

Read More

Book Reviews

Allegheny Front

By Matthew Neill Null; Reviewed by Billie Hinton
Allegheny Front

Like the river that rushes through Matthew Neill Null’s prize-winning debut story collection, Allegheny Front is a thing of wild beauty. And while the writing is what won Sarabande Books’ Mary McCarthy Prize in Short Fiction, the physical book itself is a delight to hold in the hand: textured cover with big bold imagery, lush creamy pages, the perfect size and weight for ease of reading. Which is all beside the point when the stories inside are riveting and raw, rich and searing, with turns of phrase as clear and sharp as the masterful cracking of a whip….

The Extraordinary Journey of Vivienne Marshall

By Shannon Kirk; Reviewed by Dawn Reno Langley
The Extraordinary Journey of Vivienne MarshallVivienne Marshall’s chance to shop for the heaven she will call her own begins the day she is struck down, a victim of texting-while-walking. The 35-year-old relives her life and plans her afterlife during the course of this extraordinary (excuse the pun) novel by award-winning author Shannon Kirk.

The novel imagines a process that dying people embark upon, the last choice they actually make during their lifetime: the choice of what life after life will become. Vivienne’s images of heaven …

The High Places

By Fiona McFarlane; Reviewed by Mary Vensel White

The High PlacesFiona McFarlane’s first collection of stories, The High Places, follows the 2013 publication of her well-received novel, The Night Guest. Her debut was hailed as a meditation on isolation, identity and memory. It’s the story of Ruth, a widower living alone in an Australian beach house. She becomes convinced she sees a tiger, both outside and inside her house. Her mental state is questionable and this unpredictable narrator adds to the feeling of suspense as the story unfolds….

Empty Places

By Kathy Wiechman; Reviewed by Carol Baldwin

empty placesKathy Wiechman’s second historical novel, Empty Places, is well-researched, beautifully written, and evocative of time and place (the 1930’s in Harlan County, Kentucky).
Within the first few pages the reader meets spunky, 13-year-old Adabel Cutler who is trying her darndest to keep her family from falling apart. Adabel’s father is a coal miner who drinks too much and fights with her big brother…

Scar

By J. Albert Mann; Reviewed by Carol Baldwin
ScarScar: A Revolutionary War TaleJ. Albert Mann’s first young adult historical novel, is short but powerful. Spanning the course of just three days, Mann artfully alternates between Noah’s present predicament—he is wounded and is caring for a young wounded Indian—and the events leading up to it.

The Saints of the Lost and Found

By T. M. Causey; Reviewed by Carolyn Burns Bass

The Saints of the Lost and FoundT.M. Causey is no stranger to fiction. Writing as Toni McGee Causey, she is author of the critically acclaimed and best selling novel series featuring the zany Tammy Faye. Taking a wide turn from the quirky, non-stop action of her three Tammy Faye books, Causey’s latest novel, The Saints of the Lost and Found, goes into a dark place where some families have special paranormal gifts and though they share the strangeness of their abilities, they may or may not be trusted….

Read More