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November is soon upon us and with it comes that annual writing marathon known affectionately (and sometimes derisively) as NaNoWriMo ([Inter]National Novel Writing Month). During NaNoWriMo, participants must write 50,000 cohesive words in a single work in order to be called a winner.  Of course, most novels are longer than 50,000 words, but this number is enough to get a good skeleton down in a first draft. Such notable authors as Sara Gruen and Erin Morgenstern are said to have written their bestsellers during NaNoWriMo.

NaNoWriMo gets a lot of ink in writer circles during the month. Whether or not you’re a believer or a detractor, there is a lot of energy for writers during November. We’d like to fuel the energy with a WritingWednesday discussion of NaNoWriMo strategies. To stir the energy, the WritingWednesday links listed below contain more than 100 resources for writers on everything from inspiration to writer’s block, from first lines to last lines, and from plotting to pantsing.

Structure and Plotting

Dan Harmon Story Circle, Part 1

Dan Harmon Story Circle, Part 2

Fiction First Lines

Mastering the Middle

Writing the End

Structure of the Novel

Plotting Vs Pantsing

Craft and Technique

Transitions in Fiction

Pacing in Fiction

Exposition

Setting

Dialogue in Fiction

Verb Tenses

Narrative Point of View

Show Vs Tell

Style & Voice

Finding Your Voice

Symbolism in Fiction

Theme in Fiction

Conflict in Fiction

Killing the Clichés

Encouragement & Inspiration

Joyce Carol Oates Tweets 10 Tips for Writers

Writer’s Block: Fact or Fallacy?

The Most Useful Piece of Writing Advice You Ever Received

Development & Specialization

Emotion in Fiction

Character Assassination: Killing of Fictional Characters

Horror: Making Readers Squirm and Scream

When NaNoWriMo is Over

Fiction Revision