Guest Author: Damian McNicholl

Damian McNicholl is guest host of #LitChat on June 26, 2017 at 4 p.m. ET. Follow #LitChat on Twitter, or login to our dedicated channel at www.twubs.com/litchat.

Read More

Guest Author: Mark Powell

Mark Powell is guest author of #LitChat on June 19, 2017 at 4 p.m. ET. Follow #LitChat in Twitter, or login to our dedicated channel at www.Twubs.com/litchat.

Read More

Guest Author: Robinne Lee

Robinne Lee is guest author in #LitChat on June 12, 2017 at 4 p.m. Follow #LitChat on Twitter, or login to our dedicated channel at www.Twubs.com/litchat.

Read More
LitChat Logo

About LitChat

#LitChat is a fun, fast, and friendly way for book-lovers to talk about reading, writing and publishing on Twitter. We have moderated chat with guest authors each Monday from 4-5 p.m. E.T.

LitChat calendar icon

Coming Up

Click here to see the list of guest authors scheduled for upcoming weeks in #LitChat. You can follow #LitChat in Twitter, or login to our dedicated channel in Twubs.

kimberley cameron & Shannon Capone Kirk in #LitChat

Past LitChats

We have held #LitChat sessions in Twitter with bestselling, award-winning, critically acclaimed, and emerging authors since 2009. Click #LitChat Archives for chatscripts of past #LitChat sessions.

Author Blogs

Book Reviews

Crossover Fiction About Families

Crossover Fiction About Families

The magic pixie dust for how to reach lots and lots of readers may be elusive, but two things about book discoverability are indisputable: readers are always on the look out for good stories and writers are increasingly desperate to find their people. While the definition of crossover fiction…

read more
Writing in the Round

Writing in the Round

Writers have a complicated and ever-changing relationship with the reader. And by the reader, I mean that hypothetical audience to which you’re supposed to be writing, that intended receptacle for your wisdom, your crafted prose, the performance of your particular form of entertainment: the delivery of a story….

read more
Miami in Minneapolis: More on AWP

Miami in Minneapolis: More on AWP

The AWP Conference and Book Fair is an annual destination for writers, teachers, students, editors, and publishers. Each year more than 12,000 attendees join for four days of dialogue, networking, and unrivaled access to the organizations and opinion-makers that matter most in contemporary literature. The 2015 featured over 2,000 presenters and 550 readings. The Book Fair hosted over 700 presses, journals, and literary organizations…

read more
I Set Out to Be a Working Writer, Says Ben Mezrich

I Set Out to Be a Working Writer, Says Ben Mezrich

Ben Mezrich is not the kind of author who worries about artistic or journalistic niceties, and even less about the opinions of critics. Janet Maslin, a reviewer for The New York Times, blasted one of his “nonfiction thrillers” by wryly noting his skill at “making up conversations he did not hear, sexing up parties he did not attend,” and other writerly techniques of which she does not approve. At a recent Breakfast Salon at the Betsy Hotel, where he was Writer in Residence, Mezrich laughed off barbs like that with no trace of bitterness or resentment.

read more
Fly on the Wall With Michael Ondaatje

Fly on the Wall With Michael Ondaatje

Anyone wondering what writers talk about when they are at ease together might have liked being a fly on the wall at the Betsy Hotel the other night. Most literary events at the Betsy are not only public but also free. But this was a small private dinner party put together by the hotel and one of its literary partners, the Creative Writing Department at Florida International University….

read more
Writing to Reach a Broader Audience

Writing to Reach a Broader Audience

February brings us Black History Month and along with it the usual thoughts about why attention to the culture of African-Americans is limited to one short month—and the coldest at that. Shouldn’t all the cultures of our society be a year-round presence and part of an ongoing conversation? I’d venture to say the answer is yes, read more here…

read more
Notes from a Writers’ Conference

Notes from a Writers’ Conference

You shuffle from session to session, ingesting the proclamations of speakers as you would the invitations of a circus barker. Over here, a ten-step system for writing a synopsis! Step right up for everything you need to know about book marketing! Create intriguing characters! Hook readers with your first five words! Read more here.

read more

Scar

By J. Albert Mann; Reviewed by Carol Baldwin
ScarScar: A Revolutionary War TaleJ. Albert Mann’s first young adult historical novel, is short but powerful. Spanning the course of just three days, Mann artfully alternates between Noah’s present predicament—he is wounded and is caring for a young wounded Indian—and the events leading up to it.

read more

The Saints of the Lost and Found

By T. M. Causey; Reviewed by Carolyn Burns Bass

The Saints of the Lost and FoundT.M. Causey is no stranger to fiction. Writing as Toni McGee Causey, she is author of the critically acclaimed and best selling novel series featuring the zany Tammy Faye. Taking a wide turn from the quirky, non-stop action of her three Tammy Faye books, Causey’s latest novel, The Saints of the Lost and Found, goes into a dark place where some families have special paranormal gifts and though they share the strangeness of their abilities, they may or may not be trusted….

read more

The High Mountains of Portugal

By Yann Martel; Reviewed by Mary Vensel White
The High Mountains of PortugalFans of Yann Martel’s international bestseller, Life of Pi (2001), will find many familiar elements in his new novel, The High Mountains of Portugal. Once again, Martel plumbs the relationship between storytelling and truth and mixes tragedy with healthy doses of humor. There is another leading character from the animal kingdom; religion and faith are integral themes. But The High Mountains of Portugal is a more difficult, less cohesive read, and will no doubt produce polarized reactions.

The novel is divided into three dissimilar parts….

read more

Finding Jake

By Bryan Reardon; Reviewed By Linda Lindsey Davis
finding jakeIn Bryan Reardon’s Finding Jake, Simon and Rachel Connolly are like many other married couples: they have a house in the suburbs and two children. They differ from other couples in that they made the decision 18 years ago for Simon to shift his writing career to be the stay-at-home parent caring for their children, and Rachel, an attorney with a major law firm, would be the one who commuted to work in the city. Their story is told from Simon’s point of view, as he reflects on being a stay-at-home father.

Seventeen years ago, when Jake was born, and then three years later when his sister Lanney arrived, Simon learned to accept being the only father on the children’s playground…

read more

The Santa Claus Man

By Alex Palmer; Reviewed by Carolyn Burns Bass
The Santa Claus Man, #LitChatIt all began with the dead letters department at the New York City post office. Every year letters to Santa Claus, St. Nicholas, Sinterklaas, and other derivatives of the name, were destroyed as undeliverable mail per the policy of the U.S. postal department. In 1911 that policy changed and the New York City postmaster sent out a call for someone to receive all of the Santa Claus mail on behalf of the city’s children. A couple of years went by before John Duval Gluck, Jr. acted on impulse and stepped up. In 1913, fresh off an arrest and fines from his part in promoting the first and only bullfight in New York City, Gluck saw an opportunity to restore his reputation, bring joy to poor children on Christmas, and provide a lifestyle of prestige and privilege. The International Santa Claus Association was formed and Gluck became known as New York’s Santa Claus.

read more

The Heart Goes Last

By Margaret Atwood; Reviewed by Carolyn Burns Bass

The Heart Goes Last #LitChatThe meaning of life and love is central to Margaret Atwood’s latest novel, The Heart Goes Last. Now before you think Atwood has gone soft and written a romance, stop right there. The Heart Goes Last is a brilliant satirical look into modern society with emphasis on the breaking economy, its opportunities for corporate greed, and its impact on the middle class. How far would you go to sleep in a bed every night? Would you kill your husband to preserve your comfort?

In a not-too-distant future the American economy has collapsed to the extent that cars have become real estate, rolling from place to place to protect the inhabitants who live inside from those on the outside who would commandeer the vehicle and abuse the residents ….

read more

Girl Sent Away

By Lynne Griffin; Reviewed by Karen Struble, Ph.D.

Girl Sent AwayLord Acton’s famous saying, “Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely,” rings deafeningly true in Lynne Griffin’s new novel, Girl Sent Away. For parents of rebellious adolescents, Griffin’s story is a Nightmare with a capital N.  Basing her work on actual reports from teenagers sent to remote wilderness therapy camps, the author spins a harrowing tale of mental health care gone awry.

The novel’s main character, Ava Sedgwick, is a sixteen-year-old Massachusetts girl haunted by the unresolved trauma of losing her mother and sister during the 2004 tsunami that wreaked havoc on Thailand’s …

read more

Honey From The Lion

By Matthew Neill Null; Reviewed by Billie Hinton

Honey From The LionBy turns graphic and poetic and sometimes both at once, Matthew Neill Null, in his literary debut, shapes vivid characters, West Virginia history, and a landscape under siege into one finely-hewn novel.

Null meticulously chronicles a community in West Virginia in 1904, as old growth forest is cut by hand using horses to haul the logs. The landscape herself seems to oversee the machinations of men: businessmen, loggers (called timber wolves), union men, a preacher, women. There is union-building going on, conversations in back rooms, and men named Cur and Neversummer, Seldomridge and McBride. The landscape is perfectly rendered, the work of cutting trees is brutal…

read more

Rainy Day Sisters

By Kate Hewitt; Reviewed by Stephanie Kamerman

Rainy Day SistersUSA Today bestselling author, Kate Hewitt, begins a new series, Hartley-By-The-Sea Novels, with Rainy Day Sisters—a story of two half-sisters who long for love and acceptance, and find it in each other. Kate’s next book in the series, Now and Then Friends, is due out in August 2016.

Lucy Bagshaw’s life as a barista and aspiring artist in Boston ends abruptly when her mother, artist and liberal commentator, Fiona Bagshaw, writes openly on how she doesn’t support Lucy’s artistic capabilities and how the fame she has will not be given to Lucy. After the humiliating article is printed for all of Boston to read, Lucy’s partner…

read more

Harriet Wolf’s Seventh Book of Wonders

By Julianna Baggott; Reviewed by Billie Hinton

Harriet Wolf's Seventh Book of WondersJulianna Baggott’s newest novel, Harriet Wolf’s Seventh Book of Wonders, is brilliant and beautiful, quirky and captivating, a multigenerational tale told from four unique points of view: Harriet Wolf’s, her daughter Eleanor’s, and those of her granddaughters, Ruth and Tilton.

Baggott uses the passage of time and very specific individual experiences in a family of women to reveal the ways in which mothers and daughters—and all of us—connect. She embroiders in rich detail…

read more